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DIY: XP-100 Push Button Bolt Release (minimal tools) Login/Join 



posted
First let me start by saying this post will probably make any skilled machinist sick.
It is also admittedly not they way I would build the push button if I had access to a lathe and the knowledge and skill to use one.

The goal here is to identify the parts and minimal tools required to produce a button to make your own bolt release.
This will take time, but no specialized tools or expertise.
This release button is being installed into a McMillian stock (purchased through the group buy)

Tools used:
Vise
Cross Cut File (course cut)
Bastard Cut Mill File
Dremel Tool
Drill Press

Please through out this work take all normal safety precautions and please protect your eyes and ears while running the machines and handling parts.
This is not dangerous work, but pay attention and don't do anything stupid and get yourself hurt.

This message has been edited. Last edited by: Freeze,
 
Posts: 376 | Location: SW PA | Registered: February 28, 2015Reply With QuoteReport This Post



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The start point for the button is a 1/4" x 2" carriage bolt.
I chose this size because the square shank under the head is just about the same width and the shelf left in the inlet.

Step 1.
Clamp the bolt in a sturdy vise by the square shank


Use a Dremel (or file) to reduce one side of the bolt head to be flush with the shank.


Once complete, rotate the bolt 180 degrees and remove the opposite side of the bolt head.
This will leave us with a "foot" to engage the bolt release, so if your hole is a little too far forward or back we will still have a functioning button.

Step 2.
Mark and drill your stock.

What you want to accomplish here is to have the button move square to the bolt release.
You can get your measurements from the action itself by measuring from the centerline of the action and from the rear action screw.
Once I had the measurements from my action I transferred them to a template and then used the template to mark my stock. I use the rear action screw to hold the template in place while I mark the drill location.


Step 3.
Drill the stock.
For this you will want to use any conbination of vises and extra hands (not enough hands to take pics) so that you are drilling trough the stock square to the action inlet.
I set the stock so that the length of the action inlet (front to back was level) and the stock was level across the inlet (left to right).
Once this was all level and square to the drill bit I simply drilled the hole through the stock.
I start with a very small bit and drill slowly. Once that hole is established the hole can be opened to the diameter of your choosing.
I drilled this stock to a final size of 5/32".

This message has been edited. Last edited by: Freeze,
 
Posts: 376 | Location: SW PA | Registered: February 28, 2015Reply With QuoteReport This Post



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Step 4.
Now it is time to turn the button from the bolt.
To do this you chuck the end of the bolt (about 3/8") into the drill press and ensure it is spinning true.
Leave as much bolt extending as possible to ensure you turn a button that is long enough.


Then is is a matter of time and using your files to reduce the threaded section until it is slightly smaller than your hole.
I used 5/32" bit for my hole in the stock, which is about 0.156", so I needed to reduce my button to about 0.146-0.150".
This is slow work but don't rush it and let the files cut. I start with a course cross cut file, and then as I get close I move to the bastard cut file for a smoother finish.
Measure often and do your best to keep the reduction in diameter consistent.
Once I reach finish diameter I use a progression of sandpaper to a smooth finish (I went to 600 grit after the photo).
My button varies from 0.146" to 0.148" which I was happy with considering the method used to reduce the material.


Cut the remaining threaded section of the bolt off of the button.

This message has been edited. Last edited by: Freeze,
 
Posts: 376 | Location: SW PA | Registered: February 28, 2015Reply With QuoteReport This Post



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Step 5.
Now we will fit the button to the stock to ensure a minimum amount of slack for your specific stock, which will minimize the required length of the button.
This is determined simply by fitting the action back into the stock.
In my stock, with my bolt the head was much too tall, so I had to reduce the head of my bolt significantly to allow the bolt stop to engage the bolt.
Material from the bolt head was removed with cross cut and mill files.


This process is all about removing a little material and then trying the fit.
What you will see as you reduce the thickness of the head is that the action will fit the stock without the button touching the bolt release.
The goal here is to leave the bolt head as high as possible inside the stock, without actually touching the bolt release. This will allow full engagement of the bolt stop to stop rearward bolt travel while keeping slack out of the system (which requires and unnecessarily long stroke for the button).

And finally after the button fits without engaging the bolt stop...

This message has been edited. Last edited by: Freeze,
 
Posts: 376 | Location: SW PA | Registered: February 28, 2015Reply With QuoteReport This Post



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Step 6.
Cut the button to length.
What we want to do here is cut the extending portion of the button to the minimal length required to full release the bolt.
This is pretty simple to accomplish.
Install the button and then screw the action into the stock. At this point your bolt release button should be fully functional, but it extends way to far from the stock for practical and aesthetic purposes.
To determine the final length all you need to do is fully depress the bolt release and mark the button where it meets the stock.
Once marked remove the action and button from the stock.


Cut beyond your mark (long) and then use the bastard cut file to dress the end to the desired length.
If unsure you can cut the button back a little at a time until you are happy with the length.
You don't want to make it too short now .... because then you will have to scrap all your work and start over!

You now have a fully functional button ...




This message has been edited. Last edited by: Freeze,
 
Posts: 376 | Location: SW PA | Registered: February 28, 2015Reply With QuoteReport This Post



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Step 7.
Final finish of the button.

Once the button is the right length (and tested ) now we will finish the button.
I like to use my dremel to polish the top of the "foot" we created as well as polishing the sides of the remaining bolt shank.
I polished the button itself to 600 grit while it was in the drill press.

Once all polish work is done I will heat blue the button.
You could of course use a stainless steel bolt to start and leave a stainless finished button.

To heat blue I will simply use a propane torch and some new clean motor oil.


For those who haven't done this, it is simple.
Heat the part until it glows red and then quickly submerge into the motor oil.
I keep the part submerged until the oil stops smoking.
Please take all necessary fire safety precautions while doing this.



Step 8.
Reassemble and you have completed the project.





This message has been edited. Last edited by: Freeze,
 
Posts: 376 | Location: SW PA | Registered: February 28, 2015Reply With QuoteReport This Post



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I hope that this post is of value to some of the more adventurous members who would like to produce their own bolt release.

I find this release both practical and pleasing to the eye.

Best of luck to those who try, and if you have questions I will do my best to monitor this thread and try to answer any questions that arise.

I apologize for any poor quality pictures (I am certainly not a photographer) and for not having photos of the actual drilling process (I am limited in only having 2 hands and at times felt I needed 3).


-Freeze

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Posts: 376 | Location: SW PA | Registered: February 28, 2015Reply With QuoteReport This Post


020323



Picture of Ernie
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Thank you!


Ernie (xphunter) "The Un-Tactical"
WY-SHOT 2022 June 20-22
 
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I like it. Where there's a will there's a way!

Aaron
 
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100522



Picture of McClura
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Nice job. Thanks for the info. I really like the button release on my HS Precision. I was thinking about something like this for my XP's so I wouldn't have to send them out to get the action milled and a release installed.

Mike


---------------------------------
: Don't make old people mad. We don't like being old in the first place, so it doesn't take much to tick us off.
 
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Picture of bowstryder
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Pretry ingenious actually!
 
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One more closing thought ....

Should you find that your button is to short internally to reach the bolt stop without excess movement (meaning the length of bolt head and square shanks is too short) you have 2 options.

1. Build the button as described and then shim the internal height with rubber o-rings until the bolt head is just short of contact. (I had to do this with an H-S Precision stock)

2. A more permanent solution, and what I would do in the future, is to take a measurement (with a small wire) through the small pilot hole to see the distance from the outside of the stock to the bolt release. Then use the same wire to measure the thickness of the stock through the hole.
Subtract stock thickness from total distance, and you have a rough idea of how high the foot needs to be.

You could then turn your button, leaving that amount of foot above where you turn to button diameter.
I would allow extra internal height and then fit the button exactly as described above.

This extra height may require starting with a longer bolt.

Hope that helps those with stocks requiring a tall foot inside the stock.


-Freeze

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Picture of Leupold Man
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I think it's well done Congrats!!!!


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Freeze Thanks for the detailed photos and the good write up.

Jon
 
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Picture of HandCanonShootr
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Great job while limited to hand tools, the writeup very clear, could be followed. Maybe adding measurements of your finished button "head", and also the finished length for that McMillan.

Mike B


----------------------------
Everything in excess!
To enjoy the flavor of life, take big bites.
Moderation is for monks.

-Lazarus Long


To Ride, Shoot Straight, and Speak the Truth—
This was the ancient Law of Youth.
Old times are past, Old days are done:
But the Law runs True, O Little Son!

-Charles T. Davis
 
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quote:
Originally posted by HandCanonShootr:
Great job while limited to hand tools, the writeup very clear, could be followed. Maybe adding measurements of your finished button "head", and also the finished length for that McMillan.

Mike B


I am hesitant to post any of MY measurements because due to the actual drilling location, stock make, and materials used to fabricate the button the dimensions could vary enough that my measurements would not work for another.

I can give mine, but they SHOULD NOT be used to make a replica.

Sorry I can't seem to find this picture to re-post.

As seen in the photo above the 3 buttons I have made (different stocks) are drastically different in their measurements.



Thanks,
Freeze

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Posts: 376 | Location: SW PA | Registered: February 28, 2015Reply With QuoteReport This Post


081723



Picture of Pa. Mike
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Great write up with very detailed photos. Thanks for sharing with the membership! thumbup thumbup
 
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Picture of HandCanonShootr
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Ditto, thanks!

Mike B.
Downey, CA

(HiYa PA Mike)
 
Posts: 1526 | Location: Los Angeles, CA | Registered: December 15, 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post



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If anyone actually tries to build one of these on their own, please post your experience and results.

I would also be interested in seeing what alterations you made tot he process for your own needs.


-Freeze
 
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Thanks for sharing all your hard work with us Freeze.

Jon
 
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posted Hide Post
any chance getting the photos that are no longer viewable here?
 
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020623



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I also would like to see those pictures.
 
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posted Hide Post
Aw man!! I missed this interesting DIY project the first time around and now there are no pics!! cry The XP's clumsy bolt release is a real pain in the neck. When deer hunting I carry a very small Phillips head screwdriver in my shirt pocket in case I have a misfire. I'll be monitoring the thread in case the pics are restored.


Good luck and good hunting.
 
Posts: 1658 | Location: Springhill, LA | Registered: November 16, 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post


030423



Picture of Sawfish
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The small Philips screwdriver is standard equipment with my XPs


------------------------------
Good Shooting Makes Good Hunting
NRA Patron Member, FTRA Member;
Life Member SCI, NAHH, RMEF, and NSRPA; HHI Member #7108, Member CBA, NSSF

"A man can never have too much red wine, too many good books, or too much ammunition."
Rudyard Kipling
 
Posts: 3508 | Location: Peoples Republic of Kalifornia | Registered: March 13, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post



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quote:
Originally posted by HuntingBronco:
any chance getting the photos that are no longer viewable here?


Let me see if I can find the pics and then find a way to make them visible again.

Might take me a couple days.


-Freeze
 
Posts: 376 | Location: SW PA | Registered: February 28, 2015Reply With QuoteReport This Post



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quote:
Let me see if I can find the pics and then find a way to make them visible again.

Might take me a couple days.

Thx, Freeze. No rush. Big Grin


Good luck and good hunting.
 
Posts: 1658 | Location: Springhill, LA | Registered: November 16, 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post



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quote:
Originally posted by Sawfish:
The small Philips screwdriver is standard equipment with my XPs


I actually use 1/2 of a clothes pin.
I take one leg off the clip and then use a knife to split it length wise. I keep this for ones without a bolt release.

It works well ... costs nothing ... doesn't rattle in a pocket or pouch ... and even an idiot like me hasn't yet been able to scratch a gun with a wooden clothes pin.


-Freeze
 
Posts: 376 | Location: SW PA | Registered: February 28, 2015Reply With QuoteReport This Post


030423



Picture of Sawfish
posted Hide Post
Interesting.


------------------------------
Good Shooting Makes Good Hunting
NRA Patron Member, FTRA Member;
Life Member SCI, NAHH, RMEF, and NSRPA; HHI Member #7108, Member CBA, NSSF

"A man can never have too much red wine, too many good books, or too much ammunition."
Rudyard Kipling
 
Posts: 3508 | Location: Peoples Republic of Kalifornia | Registered: March 13, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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